3D printed models

IndyJets

Active member
Has anybody gotten tired enough of waiting for a particular mold that you've resorted to 3D printing? I'm just about to give up hope on a decent DC-9-10 (key word "decent", the old AC gen-1 screw belly mold never qualified even when it was new) in 1:400. I'm wondering if anyone else has gone down this path and what kind of results you've gotten. I don't actually own a 3D printer so if I end up creating my own model I would send it off somewhere to print, and I'd need about 30 copies to fill out the wish list.
 
...key word "decent"...

And there's the problem. For a decent print you need a decent 3D-CAD (STL or whatever)
Few exceptions withstanding most I've seen are far from decent. And then there's the postprocessing. Getting the stuff printed is the least problem.
 
And there's the problem. For a decent print you need a decent 3D-CAD (STL or whatever)
Few exceptions withstanding most I've seen are far from decent. And then there's the postprocessing. Getting the stuff printed is the least problem.
All of the 3D printed models I've seen look like they were done from bad drawings. I would do my own model in order to avoid this. I'm just having trouble finding reliable source drawings to work from. I want to have the nose and tail shape, fuselage section, and wings absolutely dead on.
 
Have you tried Shapeways? There are many great models there in 1:400.

This guy have a fantastic selection of 1:400 models, and they all seem to be finely designed.
You could send him a message somehow and ask for a DC-9-10 model.
 
The Dornier 328 in 1/200 scale is very hard to find (only made by Hera a few years back), so I resorted to a 3D printed version to create this custom which turned out reasonably well.
IMG_1913.jpeg
 
To me the Dornier looks ok but others my find fault. The finish and weight is not up to diecast standards.
Obviously the weight will never be the same, but I think the new generation of 4K and 8K resin printers will offer a huge improvement in accuracy.
 
Have you tried Shapeways? There are many great models there in 1:400.

This guy have a fantastic selection of 1:400 models, and they all seem to be finely designed.
You could send him a message somehow and ask for a DC-9-10 model.

They do have a 9-10, but the question remains whether these could be considered decent or not - as in equal to "NG-quality diecast". The 3D-render doesn't look too bad, but there's a long way to go from printing to finishing the model.
 
Obviously the weight will never be the same, but I think the new generation of 4K and 8K resin printers will offer a huge improvement in accuracy.

Yes, printers shouldn't be the issue anymore. It's the data as you correctly say.
Of course if you've plenty of cash for the hardware and software and plenty of time available, you could go and look for the real thing to scan and digitalize.;)
 
They do have a 9-10, but the question remains whether these could be considered decent or not - as in equal to "NG-quality diecast". The 3D-render doesn't look too bad, but there's a long way to go from printing to finishing the model.
It seems like Shapeways has a huge pricing markup, and I'm not the only one who's said this. A lot of model train guys won't use them for that reason. I'm going to attempt to create my own model following a tutorial I found on YouTube. We'll see how it goes.
 
They do have a 9-10, but the question remains whether these could be considered decent or not - as in equal to "NG-quality diecast". The 3D-render doesn't look too bad, but there's a long way to go from printing to finishing the model.
The model looks pretty good... except I'd rather the cockpit windows not be recessed into the model itself, so that they can be represented with decals (same as with diecast). If I used that model I'd have to putty the windows and sand them smooth...
There are other purveyors of 3D printed aircraft; hopefully someone else has something suitable for a cheaper price.
 
I've tried 3D printing models in the past but haven't been able to access a printer with the level of detail that I would like. I've decided that I will just wait for someone to make a Dash 8-300 mould, or I'll modify a Q400.
 
How difficult is painting and decaling a one-piece 3D printed model? I know most people who do custom diecast prefer to disassemble the donor before painting.
 
How difficult is painting and decaling a one-piece 3D printed model? I know most people who do custom diecast prefer to disassemble the donor before painting.
Well, it certainly doesn't make it easier;)

And I may add, it further reduces the chances to make it look decent.
 
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I'm curious about the feasibility of 3D printing "NG quality" metal models. I assume it's possible given the best equipment available today, but would be prohibitively expensive..
 
I have done my research and figured out

That you dont want to 3D print diecast

Its a sand type printing snd you have to have a kiln

Machines range from 100k plus better off making your own zinc mould at around 40k

I do some printing work and had a dc-9 i think i just stopped it since I dont have time right now
 
I have done my research and figured out

That you dont want to 3D print diecast

Its a sand type printing snd you have to have a kiln

Machines range from 100k plus better off making your own zinc mould at around 40k

I do some printing work and had a dc-9 i think i just stopped it since I dont have time right now
So you're talking about 3D printing a wax master and using that to make a mold? I was wondering about 3D printing directly in resin. There's a guy on Facebook who's done some that way and they look pretty good to me...
 
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